Hyundai Recall Update

Back in September of last year, we reported that Hyundai had issued a recall for various vehicles because of a faulty antilock brake system module.  The problem had to do with brake fluid leaking internally within the module that caused the electronics to short circuit and start an engine fire.  Since that report, we have encountered an actual situation with a Hyundai Santa Fe, one of the vehicles recalled.  According to the vehicle owner, the fire spread very quickly and barely had enough time to get his passengers out of the vehicle before it was fully engulfed.  The defective part and extent of damage are shown in the photos below.  Owner notification of the recall was supposed to have begun in October of 2020.  Owners who have not received their notification letter should contact their Hyundai dealer to arrange for a free inspection and/or repair.  The dealer will most likely ask for the vehicle identification number, which can be found on the lower left hand corner of the windshield or on the sticker inside the driver’s side door or pillar.  The list of vehicles to which this recall applies was given in our September 2020 blog entry.  It should be noted that Hyundai has expanded this recall to include approximately 180,000 2019 through 2021 Tucson SUVs.  However, the problem with the Tucson vehicles does not have anything to do brake fluid leakage as much as it does corrosion of the electronic circuit board causing engine fires. The circuit board is located behind the ABS assembly and is therefore not visible in the photograph below.       

Extent of Fire Damage to Hyundai Santa Fe
Faulty Antilock Brake Module

Brake and Battery Issues Prompt GM to Recall Trucks

General Motors has recalled approximately 464,000 Cadillac CT6, Chevrolet Silverado 1500 and GMC Sierra 1500 trucks, all 2019 model year vehicles.  GM has discovered that a software error can disable the electronic stability and antilock braking systems.  According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), dealers are supposed start repairing recalled vehicles on January 27, 2020.  The repair will consist of reprogramming the antilock brake computer.  GM has also recalled 350,000 model years 2019 and 2020 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 and GMC Sierra 1500 pickup trucks.  The problem with these vehicles is that the cable that goes from the battery to the alternator has too much glue in it.  As a result, the glue imposes a resistance to the flow of current and can cause the engine to stall, and possibly ignite.  This recall is also expected to begin on January 27, 2020.  Dealers are supposed to inspect the cables and clean the connections if necessary.  For additional information, owners can contact GM by visiting their website at www.gm.com, then scrolling to the bottom of the page and click on recalls.   Please have your vehicle identification number ready as you will be prompted to enter it to see if your vehicle is affected. 

Mazda Recalls SUVs for Engine Stalling

Mazda Motor Company has announced that it is recalling 262,000 sport utility vehicles as a result of a problem that causes the engine to stall.  The vehicles that are involved in the recall are 2018 – 2019 Mazda 6 midsize sedans and CX-5 SUVs; and 2019 Mazda 3.  The problem has been identified as a software error. Dealers will reprogram the computers at no cost to the affected owners.  The recall is expected to begin on August 26.  For additional information, consumers can contact Mazda by calling 1-800-222-5500 or visiting their website at https://www.mazdausa.com.  The website will refer owners to their recall site which will prompt owners for their vehicle identification number (VIN).  The VIN will let owners know if their vehicle is part of the recall.

Takata Air Bag Recall, Part 2

Back in May of this year, it was announced that Takata had recalled its air bags used in several different vehicle manufacturer’s vehicles.  According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Takata has extended that recall to include 19 million vehicles from 12 manufacturers.  The current list of manufacturers includes BMW, Honda, Mazda, Chrysler, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Daimler Trucks North America, Daimler Vans USA, Subaru, Ford, Toyota, and General Motors.  Owners are advised to go to www.safercar.gov and click on the “Takata Recall” button on the toolbar to see of their specific vehicle is on the list of those recalled.  Note that the list is extensive and should be reviewed carefully.  The website also offers owners an option to enter their vehicle identification numbers to check for recalls.  The vehicle identification number can be found on most vehicles on the lower left corner of the windshield or the manufacturers sticker located on the inside edge of the driver’s side door or pillar.  The vehicle identification number is a seventeen digit number unique to each vehicle.  Owners can also check with their dealers for recall information.

Takata Airbag Recall

Earlier this year, several automobile manufacturers announced recalls of different vehicle makes as a result of faulty airbags manufactured by a Japanese company called Takata.  Takata manufactured airbags for both driver and passenger’s sides in the recalled vehicles.  After investigation by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and others, it has been determined that the propellant used in the airbags has a tendency to deteriorate in humid areas.  As a result, when the airbag is deployed, the combustion of the propellant which produces the pressure to inflate the bag can do so with greater than necessary force.  The excessive force can cause the inflator to rupture sending pieces of metal to the occupant of either the driver or passenger seat resulting in greater risk of injury to the occupant.  The vehicles that are involved in this recall are Acura, BMW, Chrysler, Dodge, Ford, General Motors, Honda, Infiniti, Lexus, Mazda, Nissan, Subaru, and Toyota.  The recall covers models years generally from 2002 through 2008.  In order to determine if the recall applies to a specific vehicle, owners can go to the manufacturer’s website and use its VIN lookup tool or contact a dealer and ask to speak with a service writer then give that person the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN).

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