Fire and Appliance Safety, Part 2

In keeping with the previous post on fire and appliance safety, photographs of some items that have been encountered in previous fire investigations are posted here: the first photo shows an electric stove where the fire originated in the control panel.

                                                                                                    electric-stove-fire

The next photo shows a packaged a/c unit damaged by fire as a result of contact made between a live wire and the edge of an opening in the metal casing.

through-the-wall-unit

The third photo shows a riding lawn mower that ignited, most likely, by the owner’s failure to keep the machine clean between cuttings.

riding-lawn-mower

The next photo is of a paper shredder, also burned, because the machine was not kept clean.  Dust created by shredded paper is just as flammable as any petroleum based fuel if the right conditions exist for ignition.

paper-shredder

The propane gas regulator shown below was installed backwards so that gas was flowing into the outlet port and existing through the vent port.  Since there was no pressure regulation, the cap covering the adjustment, (located in the center) was blown off and the escaping gas ignited.  The homeowner happened to be standing nearby and was severely burned.

improperly-installed-propane-gas-regulator

The next photograph shows a line cord attached to an aquarium pump. The problem was identified as a faulty line cord that was not properly sized for the continuous operation. As a result, the line cord insulation melted and ignited.

aquarium-pump-motor0004

The following photograph shows a coffee maker that ignited and caused a small kitchen fire.  This appliance was destroyed badly enough so that the actual problem was unidentifiable.

coffee-maker-fire

The pipe flange in the next photograph cracked after having been in use for several years.  The leaking gas percolated up through a homeowner’s lawn and ignited; destroying the home as well as damaging a neighbor’s house.

cracked-gas-line-flange

Corrosion of the copper gas line resulted in the leaking of propane gas and a sudden explosion.  The explosion destroyed a residential structure.

fractured-gas-line

Advertisements

Product Recalls

Ford Ranger:

The Ford Motor Company has recalled nearly 400, 000 year model 2004-2006 Ford Ranger vehicles manufactured between March 24, 2003 and May 4, 2006.  Ford has learned that if the driver’s side front air bag is deployed, the inflator can also rupture.  This recall is part of the Takata air bag problem.  In the event of a rupture, metal fragments cause serious injury and possibly death to the driver and passengers.  Ford will notify owners and will replace the inflators free of charge.  The recall was expected to begin on March 7, 2016.  For additional information, owners can contact Ford by calling 1-866-436-7332 and referring to recall number 16S03.

Propane Gas:

Now that the winter is coming to an end, most homeowners and businesses will begin to use their furnaces less and less.  But, before that happens, there is an ironic twist that consumers should know about.  Approximately 118,000,000 gallons of propane had been recalled due to insufficient odorization.  That is, the gas contains an insufficient level of odorant to help alert consumers of a gas leak.  Failure to detect a gas leak can result in fire and explosion hazards.  The propane gas has been distributed in the following states: Arizona, Idaho, Kentucky, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Washington, Wisconsin, and Utah.  Consumers should contact their gas supplier or Crescent Point Energy Corporation to arrange for an inspection of their equipment.  Crescent Point Energy can be contacted by calling 1-866-421-4266.  The Consumer Product Safety Commission has assigned a recall number of 16-101 dated February 12, 2016.

Gas Station Hose Swivel Sets:

The Consumer Product Safety Commission has reported that Franklin Fueling Systems has recalled approximately 9000 gas station hose swivel fitting sets. The swivel fitting can separate allowing fuel to spill creating a fire and explosion hazard.  The swivel fittings have been stamped with date codes for both ¾ and 1 inch hose diameters.  For ¾ inch hoses, the date code range is M1615 to M3515.  For 1 inch hoses, the date code range is M2215 to M4115.  Fueling stations should immediately stop using the recalled hose/fitting set and contact Franklin Fueling Systems to receive a full refund or a replacement hose/swivel fitting set.  Franklin Fueling Systems can be contacted by calling 1-800-984-6266.

%d bloggers like this: