Update – The Problem with PEX Pipe

In July of last year, an article on the problems with PEX pipe was published.  In that article, one of the things that was described was the fact that multiple failures were being seen in the same line.  The failures that were described were encountered during the same investigation.  However, a case that was investigated last year has been reopened.  At the time of the investigation, the failed section of PEX pipe was recovered and the section repaired and the line placed back into service.  Now, a few months later, a second failure has occurred in the same line that initially failed and was repaired.  What to do?  Replace PEX piping with copper piping, if feasible.  If not, PVC, CPVC  and polybutylene piping can be acceptable substitutes (at this time 1/8/13). An example of the failure observed in PEX pipe is shown in the photograph below.

Holes In PEX pipe allowing water to escape

Holes In PEX pipe allowing water to escape

 

Sudden Acceleration

Recently, we were retained to investigate sudden acceleration in a 2006 Kia Sportage.  While conducting routine research, no recalls or complaints were discovered.  This case brought to mind that earlier this year, a lot of attention was given to the sudden acceleration complaints inherent in some Toyota vehicles.  This brought back memories of sudden acceleration complaints in Jeep vehicles back in the late 90s.  In fact, ABC used to air a program called Prime Time Live. During one show, they investigated sudden acceleration and determined that the brake pedal had been moved to a position which was no longer in line with the steering column and thought to cause drivers to confuse the brake pedal with the accelerator pedal.  Although, it does not appear that physical location of  the pedals is a problem, it seems that no one really knows what is causing sudden acceleration.

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