Recalls for Fire and Electrical Defects

The following information describes products that have been recalled for serious defects that can result in fire or electrical shock. All of the information reported here has been reported by the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

 

Goodman Air Handlers

 

Goodman Manufacturing has recalled approximately 210,000 air handlers because the units have been found to remain powered when the electrical disconnect handles were removed. The disconnect is a device that is supposed to deenergize the unit when the handle is removed, breaking the electrical circuit that supplies current to the air handler.  The air handlers involved in this recall are models that begin with the letters AWUF and ACNF.  The serial numbers associated with these models begin with 1511, 1512, and 1601 through 1610.  The units were sold by Goodman dealers between November 2015 and October 2016 for use in apartment complexes, townhouses and condominiums.  Mechanical contractors would then install the air handlers along with their condensing units as a package.  Owners should contact Goodman for a free inspection and free repair.  Goodman can be contacted by calling 1-888-386-2075 or visiting Goodman on line at www.goodmanmfg.com and clicking on “Air Handler Product Recall”.  Lastly, the recall number for this recall is 17-103.

 

Carrier Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners

 

The Carrier Corporation is recalling approximately 94,000 packaged terminal air conditioners (PTAC) and packaged terminal heat pumps (PTHP) for problems with the power cords. The units were sold under the Bryant, Carrier, and Fast brand names.  The power cords of these units can overheat and pose a fire hazard to consumers.  It should be noted that approximately 185,000 units were previously recalled in November of 2007 and another 285,000 units recalled in December of 2015.  This recall also includes those units that received a replacement power in the 2007 recall.  The recalled units have capacities of 7000, 9000, 12,000 and 15,000 BTU/Hr and connect to 208/230 volt power.  The recall covers the following units: Carrier models 52CE, 52CQ, 52PE, 52PQ, 52PC, 52ME and 52MQ; Bryant models 840, 841, and 842; and Fast models 840, 841, and 842.  Consumers should discontinue use of these machines and contact Carrier to receive a free replacement cord.  Carrier can contacted by calling 1-800-761-8492 or visiting www.carrier.com and clicking on “Important Product Safety Recall”.  The recall number for this recall is 17-094.

 

Philips Lighting Metal Halide Lamps

 

Philips Lighting is recalling 256,000 metal halide lamps. The company has recognized that the lamps can shatter and cause hot glass debris to fall and pose fire and laceration hazards.  The recall applies to Philips Energy Advantage Ceramic Metal Halide Lamps, model CDM330.  The lamps were manufactured between May 2011 and March 2014.  Both clear and coated versions of the lamp are included in this recall.  The recall applies to lamps with the following date codes:

1E, 1F, 1G, 1H, 1J, 1K, 1L, 1M, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H, 2J, 2K, 2L, 2M, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 3E, 3F, 3G, 3H, 3J, 3K, 3L, 3M, 4A, 4B, and 4C. The date code can be found on the base of the lamp or the glass bulb.  Consumers should stop using the bulbs and contact Philips for a free replacement.  Philips can be contacted by calling 1-866-253-5503 or visiting www.philips.com and clicking on “For Professionals” and then “Recalls”.  The recall number for this recall is 17-100.

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What’s Going on With Carrier and Goodman?

 

For a number of years, the Carrier Corporation has been manufacturing air conditioning equipment and selling their products all over the world.  Virtually everyone in the HVAC industry and a large part of the consuming public is familiar with the Carrier name.  To a lesser extent, the Goodman Company has also been manufacturing air conditioning equipment.  Although the Goodman Company is not was well known as Carrier, the two companies manufacture some of the same products.  Case in point: packaged terminal air conditioning units or PTACs as they are more commonly known.  These are units that are commonly found in motel rooms.  Recently, both companies recalled some of their PTAC units, Carrier on December 22, 2015 and Goodman on February 17, 2016.  But, the most troubling commonality is that the recalls are for the same problem.  That is, both companies recalled their products because their PTACS were equipped with line cords that could overheat and pose a burn hazard to consumers.  The only reason that line cords overheat is because they are sized too small for the unit’s load; i.e. the unit is drawing more current than the line cord can handle.  How does that happen?  This problem is not something that has been recently discovered.  It is not something that belongs to new technology innovations.  Any company that has been manufacturing an electrical device for any length of time has to know full well what the consequences are of undersized wiring for a specific load.  So, again how do companies like Carrier and Goodman get it wrong?  If the problem can’t be in the lack of knowledge, it has to be in the manufacturing process.  Maybe it’s time for some worker retraining.

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