Wet Weather and Engine Damage

The recent rain storms in the southeast have been causing drivers a lot of trouble.  In addition to the flooding, the rain has been causing vehicle engines to stall.  It’s easy to see how water might be getting into engines and causing damage to pistons, rods, crankshafts, and bearings.  When such a claim is encountered, one of the first things to be done is to obtain an oil sample.  When water mixes with oil, the tendency is for the water to separate from the oil.  Water is naturally heavier.  Its density is 62.4 pounds per cubic foot.  Motor oil, on the other hand, has a density of approximately 55 pounds per cubic foot (depending on the weight of the oil).  After the sample has been obtained, if the oil appears to fill the entire occupied space, then no water most likely entered the engine.  However, if the oil appears to be “floating”, then water has most likely entered the engine.  Examples of oil in both states are shown below.

Uncontaminated motor oil sample

 

Motor oil suspended in water

WARNING:  if you know that your engine is about to fail and you are going to have to pay for a new engine, don’t try pouring water into the engine and claiming to your insurance carrier that it was flooded.  First, a wear metals analysis will indicate the condition of your engine.  Second, the vehicle better have been in a flood and even then, the entry point of the water into the engine will have to be established.  Third, the damage to the engine has to be consistent with that caused by water.

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Haier Recalls Freezer Refrigerators

Haier Appliances in cooperation with the Consumer Product Safety Comission, has recalled 137,000 combination freezer/refrigerators due to a fire Hazard.  The units contain an electric component that can short circuit resulting in a fire.  The company has not identified the component but, recommends that consumers unplug and stop using the affected units.  The units involved in this recall are 10.1 cubic feet models, sold at Lowe’s and independent retailers.  The units were sold between September 2014 and September 2018.  Three models have been identified: HA10TG31SB, HA10TG31SS, and HA10TG31SW.  Consumers will also have to check their unit’s serial number in order to make sure it is part of the recall.  Both Haier and the Consumer Product Safety Commission have set up web pages with the applicable model and serial number information.  For Haier: go to www.haierappliances.com click on recalls at the bottom of the page.  The next page that appears will prompt the user to enter model and serial number information.   The page will then tell the user whether the recall is applicable to their appliance.  For the CPSC: go to www.cpsc.gov, enter Haier recalls in the search box at the top of the page.  The next page will show the recall for this unit.  It is currently the first recall listed.  Click on the title of the recall and the specifics will then appear.  Scroll down until the page shows the applicable model and serial numbers.

Currently, Haier is providing free repairs or offering a $150 rebate toward the purchase of a new Haier refrigerator.  To schedule a repair, owners can call 1-888-364-2989.  A photograph of one affected model is shown below.

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