Changes

A private practice, whether it be a legal, medical, or engineering, is a business.  It’s a big mistake to assume that just because you are a professional, business will automatically come to you.  It’s nice when that happens but, the reality is that you have to work at attracting clients.  That means that you have to know what your potential clients need and then filling that need.  Changes come when anything that affects economic activity causes business to increase or decrease.  When business changes, adjustments sometimes have to be made in personnel, methods, management, and product.  This list is by no means all-inclusive.  Marketing is one of the most important functions in any business.  As business fluctuates, sometimes adjustments have to be made in marketing strategy.  Where direct mail campaigns were once enough to stimulate orders, direct contact with clients might now be necessary to bring in those orders.  However, marketing a professional practice is a little different.  The product is a service.  When I first started, marketing to potential clients consisted of making phone calls and direct mailings.  As business increased and time became more precious, the marketing strategy changed to a quarterly newsletter  that was mailed (not emailed) to clients.  That strategy worked for several years.  From client feedback, the strategy worked because the time interval between mailings seemed to be very acceptable to the majority of the recipients.  As a result, the name of the business was kept in front of the client and at the same time, the client was learning of news that potentially affected the client.

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Takata Air Bag Recall, Part 2

Back in May of this year, it was announced that Takata had recalled its air bags used in several different vehicle manufacturer’s vehicles.  According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Takata has extended that recall to include 19 million vehicles from 12 manufacturers.  The current list of manufacturers includes BMW, Honda, Mazda, Chrysler, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Daimler Trucks North America, Daimler Vans USA, Subaru, Ford, Toyota, and General Motors.  Owners are advised to go to www.safercar.gov and click on the “Takata Recall” button on the toolbar to see of their specific vehicle is on the list of those recalled.  Note that the list is extensive and should be reviewed carefully.  The website also offers owners an option to enter their vehicle identification numbers to check for recalls.  The vehicle identification number can be found on most vehicles on the lower left corner of the windshield or the manufacturers sticker located on the inside edge of the driver’s side door or pillar.  The vehicle identification number is a seventeen digit number unique to each vehicle.  Owners can also check with their dealers for recall information.

Thanksgiving

R.J. Hill Consulting would like to wish everyone a very Happy Thanksgiving.

Duramax 2.8L Diesel Engine

General Motors has announced that it has incorporated the Duramax 2.8 liter turbo diesel engine in to its 2016 Chevrolet and GMC Canyon trucks.  In addition, General Motors has announced that the EPA has certified the trucks for getting 31 mpg on the highway.  On November 17, Engineering News Record reported that the engine is a four cylinder diesel and generates 181 horsepower and 369 foot pounds of torque.  In addition, two wheel drive vehicles equipped with six speed transmissions will get EPA estimated mileage rates of 22 mpg in the city and 25 mpg in combined driving.  For those interested in four wheel drive vehicles, the mileage rates are 20 mpg in the city, 29 mpg on the highway and 23 mpg in combined driving.

Duramax was created in 1998 as a result of a joint venture between General Motors and Isuzu to manufacture diesel engines.  Specifically, the goal was to manufacture the first high pressure, common rail, direct injection engine.  Prior to the Duramax engine, GM used an engine that was made entirely of iron in a V-8 configuration, was of the indirect injection type, took up 6.5 liter, rated at 215 horsepower and 440 foot pounds of torque.  For the most part, GM began installing 6.6 liter diesel engines in some of the full size pickups back in 2001.  As the demand evolved, so did the engine.  From 2001 until the present, there have been 5 variations until now when the 2.8 liter engine has been introduced into the midsize truck range.

Thank You!

Thank you to all who sent congratulatory wishes on our 32 year anniversary.

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