Looks Like Dometic Still has Problems!

Several years ago, Dometic, the company that manufactures absorption refrigerators for RV’s, had to recall some of it’s products as a result of a leak in the coolant circuit that could result in a fire.  Since that recall, Dometic  has had to expand that recall to an additional 745,574 refrigerators (see NHTSA campaign # 08E032000). According to NHTSA, the problem is still in the boiler tube which can crack. As a result, the coolant can leak and ignite. Apparently, fires are still occurring. Presently investigating fire in horse trailer equipped with a Dometic absorption refrigerator.

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More Recalls?

Whatever happened to the days when recalls were something you never heard about? remember when cars and appliances were built to last and not hurt anyone or anything? Remember when a manufacturer was disgraced if they built a bad product? Those days are long gone and have been for a long time. Those of us that grew up in the 50s and 60s can remember those times. But, those born in the late 60s and afterward do not know a time when american products and quality have NOT been in question. Recalls are part of life. Just take a look at NHTSA’s website or the website of the Consumer Products Safety Commission. Both are filled with problems that plague products, manufacturers, and  consumers. So what’s the answer? The answer is that we have known what the answer is for a long time. A lot of lessons were learned about quality during the 1970s. We know how to build good products. But, building good products doesn’t put people to work. Selling products puts people to work and keeps them working. Building good products keeps them in use for long periods of time. So, if something lasts, sales will be lower than if the product lifetime is shorter. Shorter lifetimes equates to a demand for more products. More products means faster production rates. Faster production means poor quality. Poor quality means more recalls. A vicious cycle?

Does Ford Have A New Fire Hazard?

Recently, an examination of a 2010 Ford F250 was conducted in order to determine what caused the fire. Strangely enough , the vehicle that was examined exhibited some of the same damage that occurred when Ford had the problem with the defective brake switch. In this case, not only was the brake switch completely destroyed but, the master cylinder was almost completely melted. Only bit parts of the housing, piston and spring remain. As far as damage to the engine compartment is concerned, the fire originated on the driver’s side and consumed the inner side of the wheel well, fuel lines, air intake  and burned a hole in the valve cover. The only thing that was damaged but, wasn’t consumed was the power center. The fire then moved across the front, consumed the radiator and a/c condenser, worked it was way to the passenger’s side and consumed everything that wasn’t steel, except for the copper wiring. Anyone seeing anything similar?

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